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AIME in town with aim to help students

The Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) was in town this week to discuss the national body’s aim for local indigenous students.

Whyalla Mayor Lyn Breuer met with a delegation from the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) this week to discuss the national body’s aim for local indigenous students.

Whyalla Mayor Lyn Breuer met with a delegation from the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) this week to discuss the national body’s aim for local indigenous students.

The team from AIME is in Whyalla for a week doing the ground work for its educational program that gives Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander high school students the skills, opportunities and confidence to finish school at the same rate as their peers.

Mayor Breuer met with AIME Corporate and Philanthropic Partnerships Manager Jake Thomson, Federal Government Employment Facilitator David Hayward and AIME Mentor and Centre Manager Rhian Miller this week.

The group outlined AIME’s program which it hopes to roll out in Whyalla by next year while also aiming to have some students gain an insight later this year to the program.

Basically, it involves helping Indigenous students during their high school years and preparing them for further studies or career opportunities beyond high school with university one of the options.

The program allows students from Year 7, 8 and 9 to get a basic introduction to university and what facilities like the Whyalla campus have to offer. Moving on to Year 10, students are taught to be leaders within the program. At Year 11 they go on to goal setting and then start to really decide what they want to do during Year 12.

It involves having students visit university on a regular basis, work with existing uni students in a mentoring capacity and also make contact with university teachers and staff.

Mayor Breuer said Council was happy to support to the program and said it was a positive for Whyalla and its indigenous students.

“We would support anything that is going to help school students in Whyalla,” Mayor Breuer said.

“This is a really positive program and we see the benefits of helping indigenous students excel in their schooling, finish off their high school education and have the opportunity to go on to university.”

Mr Thomson said the aim of this visit by AIME was to make people aware of the program and meet with stakeholders to discuss the opportunities. He said the program was aimed at demystifying university for indigenous students and tackling education inequality.

Meeting with council, university, school and community representatives, he said the response had been overwhelmingly positive as they “got the word out there” on what the program involves.

“We know there is a lot of good work already being done to help indigenous students are we are just here to further that work,” Mr Thomson said.

“This visit was about connecting with those that would be involved and there will also be community consultation involved in the process.

“So far the university is in board with our goals and we will be talking further with the schools while we are here.

“This is about helping all indigenous students to achieve the best they can with a ‘no shame and aim’ step by step type of program.

“This isn’t just about university education, we know uni isn’t for everyone but it is about overall education support and taking the stress out of education for the students.”

The program could eventually provide employment in Whyalla with plans to employ one person to help run the program here.

AIME will return to Whyalla during the year to conduct more consultation and put the program in place.

 

 

 

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